My Cave

 

My cave

I found the cave high in the mountains by accident, if such things exist, wandering through tunnels of ancient rock, in pitch darkness, feeling my way for miles. My hands were raw with scraping against rock. There came a point where to go back was probably harder than going forward and as I stumbled, at the end of my strength, I saw a light ahead and rushed towards it. As I lurched towards the light, a strange figure was silhouetted against the daylight and I saw it was a reindeer and knew I was safe. My guide had come to meet me and I breathed a great sigh of relief.

I left the depths of the cave and found it grew wide and filled with light as I moved forwards and found myself on a wide ledge, maybe fifty feet across and the same deep, the surface filled with fine white sand. In the middle of it were large quartzite boulders arranged in a circle, and in the centre of the circle there were ashes that felt warm still. From the air, I knew we were high up, but the view was not alarming. Rather, I saw forests spreading out below my ledge and I saw there was a narrow path leading from my cave down into the forest. It began with wide steps and then was lost in foliage as it wound down the side of the mountain and into the forest.

The scent of pine and leaf-mould filled the air and I could sense a hint of winter snows, but whether going or coming I couldn’t tell. The forest was a mixed one, but this high, it was mainly pines. Further away I could see the vivid greens of deciduous broad-leaved species.

That first visit I was content to stay on the ledge, lighting a fire from stacked logs in the entrance to the cave, and sitting watching the flames and being still. Resin smouldered at the edge of the blaze, bubbling and finally igniting with blue tongues of fire that danced amid the yellow ones. The air became cold as night fell and only the thick soft coat of my guide laid next to me kept me from freezing. Who better to travel the dark night landscapes with than a reindeer?

Later visits I began to explore the forest around us but to begin with I loved to just sit at the entrance to the cave as the winter swept in. The fire pit moved deeper into the shelter of the cave as the cold took control of the forest, and I would sit wrapped in blankets and furs, dreaming, watching as snowflakes danced in the wind. The firewood was restored each time I came but in spring I learned who had done it: I did. By some twisting of time, I laboured long bringing back fallen wood and chopping it into logs, so that the winter I had already lived through might have fuel. Each time I filled the stack, I came back and discovered the wood gone. Time means nothing there, as long as you honour commitments. You get used to it. It helps not to think about it too hard or your brain swims; some things are just better accepted unless you can really figure them out properly.

Sometimes, when I am feeling stressed or miserable, I let the memory of my cave come back to me; the scent of pine resin and snow floods me with other sensations and I feel the deep silence of the high mountain guarding the great forest and for a second or two at least, I feel peace.

That’s all you can ask for, some days.

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10 thoughts on “My Cave

  1. Oh Viv! what a beautiful picture! I so want to go there. Not out of a need to escape, but to experience the beauty and the quiet.
    Your writing makes me feel as though I am there.
    Thank you for that.

  2. I think you need to get a woodstove 🙂

    This is just right up my alley.
    I was right there and I came back smelling of smoke and peace.
    Wonderful, really

  3. I feel transported to your sacred grounds. Richly described, down to the welcoming smell and the chill in the air.

    Wish there was room for a short Greek from the Americas. I once journeyed to merry old England in the time of Prince John before noblemen forced him to sign the Magna Carta on becoming King.

    Your fire is so inviting. If I could only rest my head on your lap and close my eyes for but a moment . . . I’d know heaven on earth, wouldn’t I?

    michael j

  4. Pingback: Tweets that mention My Cave « Zen and the art of tightrope walking -- Topsy.com

  5. Pingback: Sunrise on the Solstice ~ the view from the Cave « Zen and the art of tightrope walking

  6. Pingback: Equinox at the Cave | Zen and the art of tightrope walking

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